聆听教宗方济各
我们将通过这一博客,在一周之内发表教宗方济各讲话 的中文版、教宗每主日的三钟经祈祷讲话、周三例行公开接 见要理、每天清晨在圣女玛尔大之家的弥撒圣祭讲道。 教宗的讲话言简意赅、直入我们每个人的内心深处。他 的话不需要任何评论或者理论说教,只要认识了解、反思默 想足以

IN CAMMINO CON PAPA FRANCESCO
Con questo blog vorremmo mettere in circolazione, entro una settimana, anche in cinese,
le parole che Papa Francesco ci regala all’Angelus di ogni domenica, nella Udienza del Mercoledì, e nelle celebrazioni quotidiane di Santa Marta.
Papa Francesco parla in maniera chiara e diretta, parla al cuore di ognuno di noi. Le sue parole non hanno bisogno di commenti o teorie, ma di essere conosciute e meditate.
HOME - 主页     FOTO - 照片     RICERCA - 搜索     MOBILE - 移动

博客归档 - Archivio blog

Angelus
三钟经


Regina Coeli
天皇后喜乐经


Biografia
生平简历


Costituzioni Apostoliche
宗座宪章


Discorsi
讲话


Encicliche
通谕


Esortazioni Apostoliche
宗座劝谕


Interviste
采访


Lettere
书信


Lettere Apostoliche
宗座书函


Messaggi
文告


Motu Proprio
自动诏书


Omelie
弥撒讲道


Preghiere
祈祷


Santa Marta
圣女玛尔大之家


Udienze
周三公开接见


Viaggi
出访


Servizi
服务


SPECIALE TERRA SANTA
圣地专题报道


messaggio in italiano
撰稿 Gigi Di Sacco
日 08 07 2015 小时 18,01

弥撒讲道,基多, 2015/07/08

教宗指出福传不是强迫他人改教而是用我们的见证吸引远方的人
在基多主持的弥撒圣祭中,教宗指出“福传可能是承载了合一、理想、意识、梦想,甚至某些乌托邦的导体”。“耶稣祈祷使我们组成这个天主是父、我们所有人都是兄弟姐妹的大家庭”。耶稣要求的合一“不是千篇一律,而是吸引人的多元化的和谐” 

Papa Francesco—教宗在基多主持弥撒圣祭时指出,“福传不是强迫他人改教而是用我们的见证吸引远方的人”;福传是建议“一个饱受战争和暴力煎熬的世界”与耶稣相遇。而这种煎熬“是‘普遍存在的个人主义’的表现,他们只想或者让人彼此冲突,这是人心中罪恶创伤的结果,而这一恶果也会影响到社会和全体受造物”。

            教宗方济各在厄瓜多尔第二台弥撒圣祭讲道核心内容是“福传那甜蜜而使人倍感安慰的喜乐”、“合一的渴望”。围绕耶稣的话——“愿众人都合而为一!为叫世界相信”——讲解了道理,强调“耶稣祈祷使我们组成这个天主是父、我们所有人都是兄弟姐妹的大家庭”。耶稣要求的合一“不是千篇一律,而是吸引人的多元化的和谐”。合一“并不是奠定在同样的喜好、忧虑、才华基础上的。我们是兄弟姐妹,因为天主创造了我们、因着祂的意愿让我们做祂的儿女”。

            百万信众冒着大雨随时可能从天降下的危险在厄瓜多尔首都基多市公共公园参与教宗主持的弥撒圣祭。教宗向大家强调了“福传美好的挑战”,为了让“源于福音喜乐的和谐充满人心和生活,那些与耶稣相遇的人;那些让祂救赎从而摆脱罪恶、痛苦、内心空虚和孤独的人”的心和生活。

            教宗讲道全文英文版如下:

“‘Father, may they be one. . . so that the world may believe’. This was Jesus’ prayer as he raised his eyes to heaven. This petition arose in a context of mission: ‘As you sent me into the world, so I have sent them into the world’.

“At that moment, the Lord was experiencing in his own flesh the worst of this world, a world he nonetheless loved dearly. Knowing full well its intrigues, its falsity and its betrayals, he did not turn away, he did not complain. We too encounter daily a world torn apart by wars and violence. It would be facile to think that division and hatred only concern struggles between countries or groups in society. Rather, they are a manifestation of that “widespread individualism” which divides us and sets us against one another (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 99), that legacy of sin lurking in the heart of human beings, which causes so much suffering in society and all of creation. But is it precisely this troubled world into which Jesus sends us. We must not respond with nonchalance, or complain we do not have the resources to do the job, or that the problems are too big. Instead, we must respond by taking up the cry of Jesus and accepting the grace and challenge of being builders of unity.

“Evangelization can be a way to unite our hopes, concerns, ideals and even utopian visions. We believe this and we make it our cry. I have already said that, ‘in our world, especially in some countries, different forms of war and conflict are re-emerging, yet we Christians remain steadfast in our intention to respect others, to heal wounds, to build bridges, to strengthen relationships and to ‘bear one another’s burdens’ (Evangelii Gaudium, 67). The desire for unity involves the delightful and comforting joy of evangelizing, the conviction that we have an immense treasure to share, one which grows stronger from being shared, and becomes ever more sensitive to the needs of others (cf. ibid., 9). Hence the need to work for inclusivity at every level, to avoid forms of selfishness, to build communication and dialogue, to encourage collaboration. We need to give our hearts to our companions along the way, without suspicion or distrust. ‘Trusting others is an art, and peace is an art’ (ibid., 244). Our unity can hardly shine forth if spiritual worldliness makes us feud among ourselves in a futile quest for power, prestige, pleasure or economic security.

“Such unity is already an act of mission, ‘that the world may believe’. Evangelization does not consist in proselytizing, but in attracting by our witness those who are far off, in humbly drawing near to those who feel distant from God and the Church, those who are fearful or indifferent, and saying to them: ‘The Lord, with great respect and love, is also calling you to be a part of his people’ (Evangelii Gaudium, 113).

“The Church’s mission as sacrament of salvation also has to do with her identity as a pilgrim people called to embrace all the nations of the earth. The more intense the communion between us, the more effective our mission becomes (cf. John Paul II, Pastores Gregis, 22). Becoming a missionary Church requires constantly fostering communion, since mission does not have to do with outreach alone… We also need to be missionaries within the Church, showing that she is ‘a mother who reaches out, a welcoming home, a constant school of missionary communion’ (Aparecida Document, 370).

“Jesus’ prayer can be realized because he has consecrated us. ‘For their sake I consecrate myself, that they also may be consecrated in truth’. The spiritual life of an evangelizer is born of this profound truth, which should not be confused with a few comforting religious exercises. Jesus consecrates us so that we can encounter him personally. And this encounter leads us in turn to encounter others, to become involved with our world and to develop a passion for evangelization (cf. Evangelii Gaudium, 78).

“Intimacy with God, in itself incomprehensible, is revealed by images which speak to us of communion, communication, self-giving and love. For that reason, the unity to which Jesus calls us is not uniformity, but rather a ‘multifaceted and inviting harmony’ (Evangelii Gaudium, 117). The wealth of our differences, our diversity which becomes unity whenever we commemorate Holy Thursday, makes us wary of all totalitarian, ideological or sectarian schemes. Nor is this unity something we can fashion as we will, setting conditions, choosing who can belong and who cannot. Jesus prays that we will all become part of a great family in which God is our Father and all of us are brothers and sisters. This is not about having the same tastes, the same concerns, the same gifts. We are brothers and sisters because God created us out of love and destined us, purely of his own initiative, to be his sons and daughters (cf. Eph 1:5). We are brothers and sisters because ‘God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying ‘Abba! Father!’ (Gal 4:6). We are brothers and sisters because, justified by the blood of Christ Jesus (cf. Rom 5:9), we have passed from death to life and been made ‘coheirs’ of the promise (cf. Gal 3:26-29; Rom 8:17). That is the salvation which God makes possible for us, and which the Church proclaims with joy: to be part of the divine ‘we’.”

“Our cry, in this place linked to the original cry for freedom in this country, echoes that of Saint Paul: ‘Woe to me if I do not preach the Gospel!’ (1 Cor 9:16). It is a cry every bit as urgent and pressing as was the cry for independence. It is similarly thrilling in its ardor. May each of you be a witness to a fraternal communion which shines forth in our world!

“How beautiful it would be if all could admire how much we care for one another, how we encourage and help each other. Giving of ourselves establishes an interpersonal relationship; we do not give ‘things’ but our very selves. In any act of giving, we give ourselves. “Giving of oneself” means letting all the power of that love which is God’s Holy Spirit take root in our lives, opening our hearts to his creative power. When we give of ourselves, we discover our true identity as children of God in the image of the Father and, like him, givers of life; we discover that we are brothers and sisters of Jesus, to whom we bear witness. This is what it means to evangelize; this is the new revolution – for our faith is always revolutionary –, this is our deepest and most enduring cry.”